Today in College Football America History – Nov. 1

Abilene Christian Wildcats

Today we celebrate this day in College Football America Yearbook history by looking back on the games we’ve covered on this date, Nov. 1. The staff at the College Football America Yearbook has been attending and coverings games since 2010, even before we actually had a physical yearbook to sell. Our staff travels the country to cover anywhere from 50 to 70 college football games per season. So, we’ve accumulated many games, many photos and many memories. Each day, we’ll encapsulate those memories here and include links to our photos and game coverage that will help you take a look back, too.

If you’re curious about the College Football America Yearbook, click here to take a look at past issues. Also click on CollegeFootballAmericaPR.com get the latest College Football America news and to find a link to the most current book. Until then, we’ll see you down the road.

So what did we do on this day in College Football America Yearbook history?

The Glass Bowl in Toledo, Ohio. (College Football America File Photo)

2011: Northern Illinois (FBS) at Toledo (FBS)

📸 ▶️ Click here for the photo gallery

Our College Football America Yearbook publisher Kendall Webb made the first of several trips by the staff to the Glass Bowl in Toledo, Ohio, to check out some MACtion between the Northern Illinois Huskies and the Toledo Rockets. So why do they call it the Glass Bowl? The stadium was a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930. In the 1940s Toledo became a central location for the glass industry, and in 1946 the stadium was renamed the Glass Bowl in honor of it.

Western Kentucky and Middle Tennessee. (College Football America File Photo)

2012: Middle Tennessee (FBS) at Western Kentucky (FBS)

📸 ▶️ Click here for the photo gallery

Our College Football America Yearbook publisher Kendall Webb made the short drive from his home across the Tennessee-Kentucky state line up to Bowling Green, Kentucky, to see the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers host the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders in a Conference USA showdown. It’s the oldest rivalry game for the Hilltoppers, and it comes with an awesome nickname — The 100 Miles of Hate. The two teams played for the first time in 1914.

Tailgaters at The Big House in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (College Football America File Photo)

2014: Indiana (FBS) at Michigan (FBS)

📸 ▶️ Click here for the photo gallery

Our College Football America Yearbook editor Matthew Postins was up in Michigan to see family for several days, and for the first time since he was a child he headed over to Ann Arbor to see a Michigan football game, as the Wolverines hosted the Indiana Hoosiers on a cold, but sunny, day at The Big House. When the stadium was built in 1927, it already sat 72,000 and it only cost $950,000 to build.

BYU and Middle Tennessee in action. (College Football America File Photo)

2014: BYU (FBS) at Middle Tennessee (FBS)

📸 ▶️ Click here for the photo gallery

Our College Football America Yearbook publisher Kendall Webb was back in what was his home base, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, to see the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders host the BYU Cougars in a non-conference showdown at Floyd Stadium.

Abilene Christian’s mascot needs a tape job. (College Football America File Photo)

2014: Abilene Christian (FCS) at Central Arkansas (FCS)

📸 ▶️ Click here for the photo gallery

Our College Football America Yearbook director of editorial content Chuck Cox made the drive to Conway, Arkansas, to see the Central Arkansas Bears host the Abilene Christian Wildcats in league action. Estes Stadium was built in 1939, but it wasn’t until 2011 when the school installed what became the school’s trademark — a purple and gray football field that alternates between the two colors every five yards. It might not be the most pleasing to the eye, but when you see a UCA football game, you KNOW it’s a UCA football game.

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